Palliative Care

A serious chronic illness is one of life’s toughest challenges – both for patients and for their loved ones. A specialized service called Lifelong Intensive Family Emotional (LIFE) Care is available both on an inpatient and outpatient basis, providing patients and families extra support and comfort during a difficult time.

Palliative Care

LIFE Care is designed to improve the quality of life for patients and their families facing the problems associated with serious or life-threatening illness. The goal is to prevent and relieve suffering by early identification and treatment of pain and other physical symptoms. Treatment also focuses on the emotional and spiritual issues that the patients and family may be experiencing.

For more information or a consultation, please call 830.401.7224.

What is Advanced Care Planning?

This is a process that allows an individual(s) to reflect on and share personal values, life goals, and preferences related to future medical care requiring life sustaining treatment. The documented plan of care provides direction to health care professionals when the person is unable to communicate their own healthcare choices. It is a gift to your loved ones who may have a difficult time during a medical emergency to make choices about your care.

What is involved in the planning process?

It is important you choose an individual(s) to understand, voice and support your health care choices when you are not able. Legal documents that state your health care preferences, where care happens, and who provides it allows family to know and understand your preferred choices when you cannot voice them yourself. A certified Advanced Care Planning (ACP) facilitator is present to assist in completion and submission of all necessary paperwork.

When/Where is Advanced Care Planning Provided?

It is recommended that the best time and place to complete Advanced Care Planning is before a health crisis occurs. An Advanced Care Planning facilitator can assist in completing all necessary legal documents while in the hospital, Nursing Home, Assisted Living for the elderly, or on an outpatient basis at Guadalupe Regional Medical Center Hospital.

Know the Facts about LIFE Care

  • LIFE Care is not just for the end of life. It can begin at the start of a serious illness and can be given alongside treatments designed to combat the disease.
  • LIFE Care could extend life. People who receive LIFE Care may live longer and have a better quality than people with similar illnesses who do not receive LIFE Care.
  • LIFE Care is focused on Advanced Care Planning. An Advance Care Planning (ACP) facilitator is a person who has been specifically trained to help facilitate this meaningful conversation between you and your family regarding your goals, values and beliefs that influence your choices for future medical treatment. Each facilitator has been trained and certified through Respecting Choices ®. During the Advance Care Planning session, you are guided through a structured interview. The facilitator will help you learn how to choose a healthcare agent(s) and will foster a meaningful conversation to arrive at your goals. Our main focus is ensuring your voice is heard throughout your treatment process.
  • LIFE Care is available in many settings. It can be received at home for those who reside in the Segiun area, in the hospital, outpatient clinics, nursing centers, and many other settings.
  • The LIFE Care team consists of specialists including physicians, social workers, chaplains and other professionals trained for your care, your own primary care physician and health care team continue in your care.
  • LIFE Care supports families. As a part of a patient-centered approach, LIFE Care allows patients and their families and friends to make plans through Advanced Care Planning, which reflects their goals and preferences. LIFE Care allows seriously ill patients to avoid stressful trips to the hospital and spend more time at home with loved ones.
What You Should Know About CPR

If your heartbeat or breathing stops, CPR may or may not work. The information below can help you decide if you want CPR when your heart or lungs stop working. The time to choose is when you feel well and have the facts you need. Ask any questions and talk with your doctor, other healthcare team members and your family.

CPR has side effects that you should know about before you choose. Age and overall health status make a big difference. The doctor who knows you best can help you make your decision.

What is CPR?
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is done for you by someone else. It can include:

  • Breathing into your mouth and pressing on your chest.
  • Electrical shocks and drugs given to try to restart your heart.
  • A tube put down your throat into your lungs to help you breath and a breathing machine.

Does CPR Work? CPR works best if:

  • You are healthy with no chronic illness.
  • Started within a few minutes after your heart or lungs stop working.

If you are in the hospital and get CPR, you have a 17 in 100 (17%) chance of it working and leaving the hospital alive. If you are older, weak, or living in a nursing home, CPR has a 3 out of 100 (3%) chance of working.

What Else Can Happen with CPR?
If CPR does help to get your heart and lungs going, it usually has side effects.

  • Your lungs are weakened and you will need to be on a breathing machine for some time.
  • You will need to be cared for in and Intensive Care Unit (ICU).
  • You may have permanent brain damage.
  • You may have damage to your ribs.

You should talk to your doctor about the benefits and risks of CPR.

If you want to try CPR
If you want to try CRP, you should talk about what results you would expect. What would your goals be? What would make you no longer want to be alive? Some examples are:

  • You remained permanently on a breathing machine.
  • You could not think or talk.
  • You did not know yourself or others.

If you decide you do not want CPR
If you do not want to try CPR, you will still get the care you need. There are many choices you can make to help you be comfortable and live as well as possible. If you do not want to try CPR, you need to tell your doctor, healthcare team and your family so that plans can be made to insure that your wishes are followed.

What You Should Know About Help With Breathing

Your lung problem sometimes makes it hard to breathe. You have choices about how to breathe with greater ease and less stress. These choices include:

  • Being put on a ventilator or “vent” (breathing machine)
  • Using a mask that gently pushes air into your lungs (BiPAP)
  • Using medicines to treat breathlessness.

The information below describes and explains your choices. The time to make these choices is when you feel well and have the facts you need. Ask questions and talk with your doctor, healthcare team and family. Think about what being alive means to you. The doctor who knows you best can help you decide what to do.

What is a ventilator (breathing machine)?
This machine pushes air and oxygen into your lungs to help you breath. It is hooked to a tube that goes through your mouth into your throat (windpipe). You cannot speak or swallow when this tube is in place. You will need to be given medicines to help you stay calm. You will need to be in an intensive care unit (ICU) while on the breathing machine.

What is bi-level positive air pressure (BiPAP)?
BiPAP pushes oxygen into your lungs through a tight-fitting mask placed over your nose and mouth. You can try BiPAP if you do not want to be on a ventilator. The mask may hurt or push on your skin. Some air can go into your belly and cause pain. It will be difficult to talk.

Would a ventilator or BiPAP work for me?
A ventilator or a BiPAP may or may not work for you. A ventilator or BiPAP works best if:

  • Your lung problem can be fixed.
  • You are using either device for a short period of time to get better after surgery or a sudden illness like pneumonia.

A ventilator or BiPAP will not work as well if:

  • Your body is shutting down from long standing health problems.
  • You have the type of illness that can no longer be treated.
  • You are not able to tolerate the air pressure required to move oxygen in and out of your lungs.

If you want to try a ventilator or BiPAP
If you think you want to try and ventilator of Bi PAP, you need to figure out what you would want to do if either device does not work. What if your health gets worse? What if you cannot think or talk? Would you want to stop the ventilator or BiPAP if these things happen? Talk to your doctor and family about what you would want them to do if these things happen and you cannot speak for yourself. If you decide not to have a ventilator or BiPAP, we can give you medicine to help you breathe easier. Sometimes people with lung disease do not want any machines. They no longer want to try to fix their lungs but want a natural death to come. They prefer to be comfortable and be given medicines to control their shortness of breath or fear caused by breathing problems. Some people feel more relaxed when:

  • Oxygen is given through a soft, flexible nose tube
  • They meditate (focus on calm thoughts)
  • They pray
  • They listen to music

There are many choices you can make to help you live as well as possible and be comfortable. If you do not want to try the ventilator or BiPAP, you need to tell your doctor and family. We can make plans to ensure that your wishes are followed.

What You Should Know About Tube Feeding

As you get older or have health problems, you may not be able to swallow normally or take in enough food or water. An option to receive food and water, when otherwise difficult, is through tube feeding.

The below information can help you decide if you want to try tube feeding. The time to make this choice is when you feel well and have the facts you need. Ask questions and talk with your doctor(s) and healthcare team. Tube feeding may or may not work for you. There may be side effects. The doctor who knows you best can help you make your decision.

What is tube feeding?
Tube feeding methods include the following:

  • A tube put through your nose into your stomach OR
  • A tube put through the skin of your abdomen into your stomach

Food and water are then slowly and gently pumped through these tubes into your stomach.

Does tube feeding work?
Tube feeding may or may not work for you. Tube feeding works best if:

  • You are healthy.
  • You need the tube feeding for a short time to recover from surgery or a sudden illness.

You may have fears about not getting food or water. You may think you will starve or be uncomfortable. This is not true. When food and water are not given, you will die naturally from your chronic illness. You will not feel hungry, and you will receive good care to make you comfortable at all times. Your faith tradition may have a position on the role of tube feeding for patients with chronic illness. Talk with a leader from your faith community.

Can tube feeding cause any problems?
Tube feeding can have these side effects:

  • Food or liquid can spill over into your lungs and cause pneumonia.
  • If your body is not working well, it can’t use food and water normally, and fluids can build up.
  • Fluids that build up in your lungs, stomach, hands and other places can be uncomfortable.
  • Your hands may need to be tied down so you don’t pull the feeding tube out if you become confused.

You should talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of tube feeding.

If you want to try tube feeding
Before you decide, think about what should be done if tube feeding doesn’t work for you. What if your health gets worse? What if you cannot think or talk? Would you want to stop tube feeding if these things happened? Talk to your doctor and your family about what you would want them to do in this situation.

If you decide you do not want tube feeding, you will still get the care you need. You may have a dry mouth and a sense of thirst. You will be given good mouth care and ice chips to help. There are many choices you can make to help you live as well as possible and be comfortable if you forego tube feeding.

If you do not want to try tube feedings, you need to tell your doctor and family. Plans can be made so that your wishes will be followed.


LIFE Care está diseñado para mejorar la calidad de vida de los pacientes y sus familiares que enfrentan los problemas asociados con enfermedades graves o potencialmente mortales. El objetivo es prevenir y aminorar el sufrimiento mediante la identificación temprana y el tratamiento del dolor y otros síntomas físicos. El tratamiento también atiende los problemas emocionales y espirituales que pudieran experimentar los pacientes y sus familiares.

Para obtener más información o programar una consulta, llame al 830.401.7224.

¿Qué es la planificación anticipada de la atención?
Es un proceso que permite a una persona reflexionar y expresar sus valores, metas de vida y preferencias personales en cuanto a la atencion médica que en un futuro podría necesitar para mantenerse en vida. El plan de atención se documenta y les indica a los profesionales de salud qué hacer bajo ciertas circunstancias médicas cuando el paciente no puede expresar sus decisiones. Es un regalo a sus seres queridos para evitarles las difíciles decisiones que tendrían que tomar por usted durante una emergencia médica.

¿En qué consiste el proceso de planificación?
Es importante que usted elija a una persona (o varias) que entienda, exprese y apoye sus decisiones sobre su atención médica cuando usted mismo no pueda. Los documentos legales para indicar sus preferencias de atención médica (dónde, cómo y quién quiere que lo atiendan) le servirán a su familia para conocer y respetar sus deseos en caso de no poderlos expresar usted mismo. Un facilitador certificado en Planificación Anticipada de la Atención (ACP) le ayudará a llenar y tramitar toda la documentación necesaria.

¿Cuándo y dónde se realiza la planificación anticipada de la atención?
El mejor momento para realizar la Planificación Anticipada de la Atención es antes de que se presente una crisis de salud. Un facilitador de Planificación Anticipada de la Atención le ayudará a llenar los documentos legales necesarios, ya sea que se encuentre hospitalizado, en una residencia o centro de vida asistida para ancianos, o sea paciente ambulatorio del Centro Médico Regional Guadalupe.

Conozca las realidades sobre LIFE Care

  • LIFE Care no es solo para el final de la vida. Puede comenzarse al inicio de una enfermedad grave y administrarse junto con los tratamientos para combatir la enfermedad.
  • LIFE Care podría prolongarle la vida. Las personas que reciben LIFE Care tienen mayor probabilidad de vivir más tiempo y tener una mejor calidad que las personas con enfermedades similares que no reciben LIFE Care.
  • LIFE Care se centra en la planificación anticipada de la atención. Un facilitador de Planificación Anticipada de la Atención (ACP) es una persona que ha sido específicamente capacitada para ayudar a facilitar esta trascendente conversación entre usted y su familia con respecto a sus metas, valores y creencias que influyen en sus elecciones para su tratamiento médico futuro. Todos los facilitadores cuentan con la capacitación y certificación de Respecting Choices ®. La sesión de Planificación Anticipada de la Atención consiste en una entrevista estructurada para orientarle. El facilitador le enseñará cómo elegir un agente de atención médica y tendrá una conversación significativa para conocer las metas de usted. El objetivo principal es garantizar que se respete su voluntad durante todo su tratamiento.
  • LIFE Care se ofrece en distintos lugares. Se puede recibir en el hogar, en el hospital, en clínicas ambulatorias, en residencias de la tercera edad y en muchos otros lugares.
  • El equipo de LIFE Care está formado por especialistas tales como médicos, trabajadores sociales, capellanes y otros profesionales capacitados para su atención, además de su propio médico de atención primaria y el equipo encargado de sus cuidados.
  • LIFE Care es un apoyo para la familia. Está centrado en el bienestar del paciente y es un medio para que el paciente y sus seres queridos puedan prever lo que le pudiera suceder por medio de un Plan Anticipado de la Atención que esté basado en los objetivos y preferencias de usted. LIFE Care permite a los pacientes gravemente enfermos evitar los viajes estresantes al hospital y pasar más tiempo en casa con sus seres queridos.
Lo que debe saber sobre la Reanimación Cardiopulmonar (RCP)

Cuando su corazón deja de latir o dejan de respirar, hay personas que reaccionan a la RCP y otras que no. La siguiente información le ayudará a decidir si desea que le apliquen RCP en caso de que su corazón o pulmones dejaran de funcionar. Lo mejor es decidir cuando usted se siente bien y está bien informado. Hable y aclare todas sus dudas con su doctor, su equipo de salud y su familia.

La RCP tiene efectos secundarios que usted debe conocer antes de elegir. Su edad y estado general de salud son factores importantísimos. El médico que mejor lo conoce puede ayudarle a tomar su decisión.

¿Qué es la RCP?
La reanimación cardiopulmonar (RCP) es una maniobra que realiza otra persona en usted. Puede incluir:

• Respiración de boca a boca y compresiones en el pecho.
• Descargas eléctricas y medicamentos que se administran para tratar de reactivar el corazón.
• Un tubo que se introduce por la garganta hasta los pulmones para ayudarle a respirar y un respirador mecánico.

¿Es eficaz la RCP? La RCP funciona mejor si:

• Usted goza de buena salud y no tiene ninguna enfermedad crónica.
• Se realiza a pocos minutos de que el corazón o los pulmones dejan de funcionar.

Si usted recibe RCP estando en un hospital, la probabilidad de salvarle la vida es de 17 en 100 (17%). Si usted es mayor, está débil o vive en un hogar de ancianos, la probabilidad de que le funcione la RCP es de 3 en 100 (3%).

¿Qué otras consecuencia tiene la RCP?
Si bien la RCP ayuda a reactivar el corazón y los pulmones, generalmente tiene efectos secundarios:

• Sus pulmones quedan debilitados y necesitará conectarse a un respirador mecánico durante algún tiempo.
• Deberá ser atendido en una Unidad de Terapia Intensiva (ICU, en inglés).
• Usted podría sufrir daño cerebral permanente.
• Usted podría sufrir daños en las costillas.

Le recomendamos hablar con su médico sobre los beneficios y riesgos de la RCP.

Si desea recurrir a la RCP en un caso de emergencia
Si desea recurrir a la RCP, debe hablar sobre los posibles resultados. ¿Cuáles serían sus objetivos? ¿Bajo qué circunstancias preferiría no permanecer vivo? Algunos ejemplos son:

• Si tuviera que estar conectado permanentemente a un respirador mecánico.
• Si no pudiera pensar ni hablar.
• Si no supiera quién es usted y no reconociera a los demás.

Si decide no recurrir a la RCP
Si no desea recurrir a la RCP, seguirá recibiendo la atención que necesita. Hay muchas opciones para ayudarle a sentirse cómodo y vivir lo mejor posible. Si no le gustaría que le aplicaran RCP, debe informar a su médico, al equipo de atención médica y a sus familiares para que hagan lo pertinente para que se cumplan sus deseos.

Lo que debe saber sobre la respiración asistida

Si tiene un problema pulmonar, tal vez se le dificulte respirar. Existen opciones para respirar con mayor facilidad y menos estrés. Estas opciones son:

• Conectarlo a un ventilador o respirador mecánico
• Colocarle una mascarilla que sopla suavemente aire a los pulmones (BiPAP)
• Aplicarle medicamentos para tratar su dificultad para respirar

La siguiente información explica sus opciones. Lo mejor es decidir cuando usted se siente bien y está bien informado. Hable y aclare todas sus dudas con su doctor, su equipo de salud y su familia. Piense en lo que significa para usted estar vivo. El médico que mejor lo conoce puede ayudarle a tomar su decisión.

¿Qué es un ventilador o respirador mecánico?
Es una máquina que sopla aire y oxígeno a sus pulmones para ayudarle a respirar. Está conectada a un tubo que se mete por la boca hasta la garganta (tráquea). Teniendo el tubo puesto, usted no podría hablar ni tragar. Deberá recibir medicamentos para ayudarle a tranquilizarse. Deberá estar en una unidad de terapia intensiva (UCI) mientras esté conectado al respirador.

¿Qué es un BiPaP o sistema de presión positiva de aire de dos niveles?
Un BiPAP introduce oxígeno a los pulmones a través de una mascarilla ajustada a la nariz y boca. El BiPAP es una alternativa si no quiere usar un ventilador. La mascarilla le podría lastimar o calar la piel. Podría entrar un poco de aire en su vientre y causarle dolor. Se le dificultaría hablar.

¿Me funcionaría un ventilador o un BiPAP?
Los ventiladores y los BiPAP les funciona a algunas personas y a otras no. Un respirador o un BiPAP funcionan mejor en los siguientes casos:

• Si su problema pulmonar se puede solucionar.
• Si los usa durante un período corto para recupararse después de una cirugía o una enfermedad repentina como neumonía.

Un ventilador o BiPAP no funcionarán tan bien en los siguientes casos:

• Si su cuerpo sufre insuficiencias por problemas de salud crónicos.
• Si tiene un tipo de enfermedad que ya no se puede tratar.
• Si no tolerara la presión de aire necesaria para meter y sacar oxígeno de sus pulmones.

Si desea recurrir a un respirador o un BiPAP
Si quisiera que le pongan un respirador o un Bi PAP, es importante preguntarse qué le gustaría hacer si estos dispositivos no le funcionaran. ¿Y si su salud empeorara? ¿Y si no pudiera pensar o hablar? ¿Le gustaría que le quitaran el respirador o el BiPAP en tales casos? Hable con su médico y su familia sobre lo que le gustaría que hicieran si usted se encontrara en estas circunstancias y no pudiera hablar. Si decide que no le gustaría un respirador o BiPAP, podemos darle medicamentos para ayudarlo a respirar más fácilmente. Hay gente con enfermedad pulmonar que no quiere máquinas. Prefieren que ya no se intente curar sus pulmones y esperar una muerte natural. Prefieren estar cómodos y recibir medicamentos para controlar la falta de aire y la ansiedad que causan los problemas respiratorios. Algunas personas se sienten más relajadas cuando:

• se les administra el oxígeno por la nariz a través de un tubo suave y flexible
• meditan (se concentran en pensamientos tranquilizadores)
• rezan,
• escuchan música

Hay muchas opciones que puede elegir para ayudarle a vivir lo mejor posible y estar tranquilo. Si no le gustaría que lo conectaran a un respirador o un BiPAP, debe informar a su médico y a su familia. Así se tomarán las medidas necesarias para cumplir sus deseos.

Lo que debe saber sobre la alimentación por sonda

A medida que envejece o si tiene problemas de salud, es posible que no pueda tragar normalmente o ingerir suficiente agua y comida. En dichos casos, una alternativa es darle agua y alimentos por medio de una sonda.

La siguiente información le ayudará a decidir si le gustaría recurrir a la alimentación por sonda en dicho caso. Lo mejor es decidir cuando usted se siente bien y está bien informado. Hable con su doctor y equipo de salud para aclarar sus dudas. No a todas las personas les conviene la alimentación por sonda. Puede haber efectos secundarios. El médico que mejor lo conoce puede ayudarle a tomar su decisión.

¿Qué es la alimentación por sonda?
Existen dos métodos de alimentación por sonda:

• la sonda se introduce al estómago por la nariz o
• la sonda se introduce al estómago a través de la piel del abdomen.

El agua y los alimentos se bombean lentamente al estómago a través de la sonda.

¿Funciona la alimentación por sonda?
No a todas las personas les funciona la alimentación por sonda. La alimentación por sonda funciona mejor en los siguientes casos:

• si goza de buena salud o
• si solo necesita la sonda por poco tiempo, para recuperarse después de una cirugía o una enfermedad repentina.

Quizá a usted le dé miedo no recibir alimentos y agua. Tal vez crea que le dará mucha hambre o sentirá molestias. Pero esto no es así. Si no se le administran agua y alimentos, usted morirá naturalmente a causa de su enfermedad crónica. No sentirá hambre y recibirá un buen cuidado para que se sienta cómodo en todo momento. Tal vez en su tradición religiosa exista alguna postura en cuanto a la alimentación por sonda para pacientes con enfermedades crónicas. Hable con algún líder de su comunidad religiosa.

¿Puede causar algún problema la alimentación por sonda?
La alimentación por sonda puede tener los siguientes efectos secundarios:

• Los alimentos o líquidos pueden meterse a los pulmones y causar pulmonía.
• Si su cuerpo no funciona bien, no absorbe bien los alimentos y el agua, por lo que puede acumular líquidos.
• Los líquidos que se acumulan en los pulmones, el estómago, las manos y otros lugares causan molestias.
• Tal vez tengan que atarle las manos para que no se arranque el tubo de alimentación en un momento de ofuscación.

Es recomendable hablar con su médico sobre los riesgos y beneficios de la alimentación por sonda.

Si sí quiere recurrir a la alimentación por sonda
Antes de decidir, piense en lo que le gustaría que pasara si a usted no le sirviera alimentarse por una sonda. ¿Y si su salud empeorara? ¿Y si no pudiera pensar o hablar? ¿Le gustaría que le quitaran la sonda de alimentación en tales casos? Hable con su médico y su familia sobre lo que le gustaría que ellos hicieran en tales situaciones.

Si no desea recurrir a la alimentación por sonda, seguirá recibiendo la atención que necesita. Podría secársele la boca y sentir sed. En dicho caso, le darían trocitos de hielo para aliviar su malestar y un buen cuidado bucal. Usted cuenta con varias opciones para ayudarlo a vivir lo mejor posible y sentirse cómodo si decide no recurrir a alimentarse por sonda.

Si no le gustaría que le pusieran una sonda, debe informar a su médico y a su familia. Así ellos podrán hacer los planes pertinentes para que sus cumplan sus deseos.